Sunday, April 19, 2015

Nomad #1


More like hitchhiking from the pages of Captain America.
 
The background to this title is very convoluted. Jack Monroe volunteered to try out a stolen Nazi super-solider serum decades after Steve Rogers became the first Captain America. Jack’s serum didn’t quite work, i.e. he got the super-abilities but he was also off his rocker for quite a bit of time. Originally he’s suppose to replace Bucky, but is too unstable. He is cryogenically frozen along with a replacement Captain America. When they awaken, they attempt to kill the original Cap, fail, are refrozen, and then unfrozen once again by a villain which leads to the fake Cap dying. Finally Bucky is cured by SHEILD of his psychosis. Steve Rogers takes pity on the poor guy (who wouldn’t?) and gives him his old Nomad identity.

So here’s the 1992 Nomad series’s concept: Nomad in a prior 4-issue mini has abducted an infant girl from her crack-addicted mother. Now the two of them are roaming the country doing odd jobs, good deeds and avoiding the law while surrounding themselves with large breasted women. The law in this case is in the form of the Commission on Super-human Activities and our old friend Henry Peter Gyrich. Also, social commentary and stuff happens regulary.

I think I saw this on TV in the early 80’s but without the topical issues.

Yes, Nomad is BJ and The Bear done over as a superhero comic book. Just substitute Bucky in place of the Bear, odd jobs in place of jobs hauling something and this lady:



in place of Judy Landers and you’ll see the basic premise is the same.

And speaking of the 80’s, this book almost seems like it was created during that decade. First off there’s Nomad’s hair style.


Next up we have the buxom beauties that fill in for women on each panel. I’m pretty sure the only place this much hot woman action occurred was outside the casting director’s office of “Miami Vice”.




Heck, we even have Bill Bixby-ese “The Incredible Hulk” walking-away-while-sad-music-plays type end credits.



There is one concept in the book that I feel is so out of place that I have to mention it. During a majority of Nomad’s battles, he goes in fighting with Bucky strapped to his back. You heard that right: He’s fighting with an 8-10 month-old on his back. While getting shot at, stabbed, judo chopped and thrown around, Bucky makes like a living backpack.





You know, I’m willing to suspend a lot of disbelief when it comes to comic book stories. I’ll believe that an alien could get superpowers from sunlight. I’ll believe that surviving a high-radiation bomb blast will turn you into a modern-day Jekyll and Hyde instead of a terminal cancer patient. I’ll even give you that exposure to outer space rays could turn someone into a giant rubber band or a pile of orange rocks. But one thing that I will not start believing is that someone can karate kick effectively while packing 20 pounds of mewling infant.




No lie pal? She’s less than a year old. Bet she likes playing with lit matches as well.

To sum up this issue: Nomad goes to Seattle. He takes an odd job helping out a woman being blackmailed for inside company info. When he can’t beat the blackmailer, he ends up stealing the information for her. Then he leaves town. I get the feeling we’re going to be in for a lot of “wash, rinse, repeat” stories, but Fabian Nicieza is doing the writing chores, so maybe not. Only time and the other 12+ issues in the crapbox will tell.

4 comments:

  1. It wasn't BJ and the Bear as much as Lone Wolf and Cub, and beloved manga series that was referenced repeatedly in this comic. And yes, I AM a big nerd.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Or perhaps BJ and the Bear was also based on Lone Wolf and Cub....hmm?

      Thanks for that info, by the way. I can see how that matches up much better being a big Kazuo Koike fan myself. I used to love those square bound books with the Frank Miller covers that First Comics put out in 1987.

      Delete
  2. I actually owned the 4-issue mini-series of this at one time. I think I stopped with this series around issue 10.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Do you remember what tipped you to dropping it from the 'ole pull list?

      Delete